This week the Love Your Gut blog looks at National Allotments Week and the importance of getting outside for your own wellbeing.

National Allotments Week 2020

National Allotments Week was started in 2002 by the National Allotments Society. It was started as a way of raising awareness of allotments and the role they play in helping people to live healthier lifestyles, grow their own food, develop friendships and support communities. The campaign week is still thriving. The theme for 2020 is ‘Growing Food for Health and Wellbeing’.

National Allotment Society President has his say

The National Allotment Society President Phil Gomersall commented:

“This year every week has felt like National Allotments Week, with more people than ever realising that growing your own food is a great way of eating healthily, getting some  exercise in the fresh air and acquiring new skills. Plot-holders have also benefited from the contact with nature and the easy camaraderie on allotment sites, helping to support their mental health and stay positive during these worrying times.”

Find out more here: https://www.nsalg.org.uk/news-events-campaigns/national-allotments-week/#:~:text=National%20Allotments%20Week%20started%20in%202002%20as%20a,stronger%20since%20the%20WW2%20Grow%20for%20Victory%20campaign.

Royal Horticultural Society

When it comes to wellbeing and gardening the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) notes that it is increasingly acknowledged that gardens and green spaces are associated with better physical, social and mental health. 1

Through its research the RHS  has been seeking better understanding of how to maximise the health benefits of gardening. It has worked on projects relating to community gardens and school gardens.

Read more about their projects here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/health-and-wellbeing

Exercise and Love Your Gut

Don’t forget exercise can also help improve your gut health – it’s all about taking simple steps every day to better health. http://lyg.kinocreative.uk/getting-gut-health  

References

  1. Kings Fund, Gardens and Health: Implications for policy and practice, David Buck 2016

https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/default/files/field/field_publication_file/Gardens_and_health.pdf